U.S. Corporations Line Up to Oppose Voter Reform Laws

(USA Features) Major American corporations are banding together to oppose ballot reform measures being proposed in dozens of states following the 2020 election, which, according to polling, generated much distrust among voters.

Warren Buffett, BlackRock, Starbucks, and hundreds of other corporations and executives have signed a statement denouncing the measures, most of which include strengthening voter identification procedures.

Other companies including Amazon, Google, and Netflix signed a statement that was released on Wednesday stating they oppose “any discriminatory legislation” that makes it harder for people to vote.

The statement appeared in advertisements in The New York Times and The Washington Post.

Some companies, however, have opted out of the campaign including Atlanta-based Coca-Cola and Delta, though both of those companies were critical of a new voter reform measure recently signed into law by Georgia GOP Gov. Brian Kemp.

Kenneth Chenault, a former chief executive of American Express, and Kenneth Frazier, the chief executive of Merck, organized the initiative in putting out the statement.

They joined with a group of black executives in March to call out companies and press them to get more involved in opposing legislation that is similar to Georgia’s new law.

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“It should be clear that there is overwhelming support in corporate America for the principle of voting rights,” Chenault said.

“These are not political issues,” Frazier added, going on to say that protecting voting rights should be bipartisan.

“These are the issues that we were taught in civics,” he said.

Republicans have blasted corporate CEOs for becoming involved in opposing legislation they say will improve voting integrity. Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., for instance, has called Delta and Coca-Cola, “woke corporate hypocrites” for criticizing the Georgia law.

A new survey from Rasmussen Reports indicates widespread suspicion and mistrust of election integrity following the November election.

“A majority (51%) of voters believe it is likely that cheating affected the outcome of the 2020 presidential election, including 35% who say it’s Very Likely cheating affected the election,” the polling firm noted on Tuesday.

“Asked which is more important, making it easier for everybody to vote, or making sure there is no cheating in elections, 60% of Likely Voters say it’s more important to prevent cheating, while 37% said it’s more important to make it easier to vote,” the firm added.

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